5/24/22 Workshop – A Poem by Catherine Imbriglio

I have had my results for a long time: but I do not yet know how I am to arrive at them.
-Carl Friedrich Gauss

The poet corresponds to a projective geometry, the poet corresponds to the knots in her hair

Sometimes in my dreams I descend four flights without ever touching a stair. Or on pavement I take one step and glide 406 feet, step, then glide again, a periodic walking on air. Outside the picture plane, the figure is moved to tears by a transformation of the object. What properties are invariant under projective mappings. If you put down “bleep” on paper, what part remains from the actual bleep. What parts are preserved if you shrink a heckler or a pear. In the reality plane, I have to scramble to write down a sigh word. At the last second my gamboling is curtailed. The power is out, so there’s no light pollution. Still, in the dark, pulling nine carrots from the earth is a bleeping experience.  She learns to bleep by herself while studying knot theory. A bowline knot is like a throat knot, a panic knot is like matted hair. It’s no big deal, this putting two and two together, like transference, like equating a sight line with elephants or bears.

Free writing prompt:
Write about being tied in knots.

2 thoughts on “5/24/22 Workshop – A Poem by Catherine Imbriglio

  1. Anita Lim

    Being tied in knots
    Knots. What a strange word.
    The K and N are stuck together
    and welded as one,
    such that the K is silent.
    NOT.
    Not possible? Not whatever…
    Sometimes, in tight situations, don’t know what to say or think.
    Strange how one is supposed to think.
    Understanding, is this foisted on us
    Or it dawns?
    I am lazy sometimes to unravel a knot,
    easier to pass it on to Anna.
    Young, bright eyes, dexterous fingers and mind.
    Tie me up, so you can untie me.
    Delight in me!

  2. Ginny

    Anita,
    I delight that you write:
    “K and N are stuck together
    and welded as one,”
    Tangibly and intangibly intertwined letters sounding the same, but with defining vastly different meanings ~

    Thank you!
    Ginny

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